KMIYC.jpegKill Me If You Can - 2011


Matthew Bannon, a poor art student living in New York City, finds a duffel bag filled with diamonds during a chaotic attack at Grand Central Station. Plans for a worry-free life with his gorgeous girlfriend Katherine fill his thoughts--until he realizes that he is being hunted, and that whoever is after him won't stop until they have reclaimed the diamonds and exacted their revenge.

Trailing him is the Ghost, the world's greatest assassin, who has just pulled off his most high-profile hit: killing Walter Zelvas, a top member of the international Diamond Syndicate. There's only one small problem: the diamonds he was supposed to retrieve from Zelvas are missing. Now, the Ghost is on Bannon's trail--but so is a rival assassin who would like nothing more than to make the Ghost disappear forever. From "America's #1 storyteller" (Forbes) comes a high-speed, high-stakes, winner-take-all thrill ride of adrenaline-fueled suspense.

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PRAISE FOR KILL ME IF YOU CAN


PATTERSON, MORE THAN ABLY ASSISTED BY THE EXTREMELY TALENTED AND WOEFULLY UNDERAPPRECIATED MARSHALL KARP, has in the closing days of summer come up with one of the must-read books of the season...This fabulous thriller is full of action and occasional humor, and just enough sex to make the heat rise when the book is closed. Give KILL ME IF YOU CAN a chance. You will not be sorry. -Joe Hartlaub, Bookreporter.com

THE FIRST-TIME PAIRING OF POWERHOUSE JAMES PATTERSON AND NEW FAVORITE MARSHALL KARP (THE LOMAX AND BIGGS MYSTERIES) yields an outstanding effort that you'll devour quickly. It is trademark Patterson: short, propulsive chapters; deft plotting; interesting characters who often behave in surprising ways; and a stunning resolution that leaves the reader wanting -- nay, begging -- for more.

Co-author Karp -- who writes some of the funnier dialogue of the genre in his own books -- can be clearly found in many of the exchanges among characters here. I admit that is an assumption: The collaboration is seamless, and there is no real sense of one writer dominating the text, but I like to think I recognize Karp's wit. -Scott Coffman, Courier-Journal

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